Global Independent Analytics

Syria at a Crossroads

The sane assumption that Syrians have to be free to elect their leaders has finally hit the government of Obama, but the U.S is still captivated with the concept of “regime change”,

Consortiumnews

 

On Friday there was issued the Vienna Communiqué, written by influential outward authorities who have provided “regime change” collapse with firearms, soldiers and funds. The plan provides strategic frame within the limits of which compromise might be reached.

The agreement encourages “the United Nations to convene representatives of the Government of Syria and the Syrian opposition for a political process leading to credible, inclusive, non-sectarian governance, followed by a new constitution and elections” and  specifies that all civic processes will be “Syrian led and Syrian owned, and the people of Syria will decide the future of Syria.”

Oddly enough this new agreement reminds of similar compromise signed in 2012 under former secretary of the UN. Soon after that, the United States and its associates constructed “Friend of Syria” plan where unlimited money and guns flow was listed.

The aforementioned agreement was supposed to be adopted within weeks but the US and its partners renewed their request and stated that President Bashar al-Assad is to be removed. A proposal suggested by Russia was dismissed but the provision to use the force under UN approval was enacted but Russia and China would not allow another brutal and diminishing regime change legitimately authorized by the United Nations Security Council.

Haytham Manna, a spokesperson for National Coordinating Body in Syria which protests both regime of Assad and foreign-approved riots, commented that in his opinion, America has failed to reach an agreement every time it was in the works.

Yet it is obscure whether the United States of America along with its associates have really alternated their minds.

Just before the Vienna session it was disclosed by Foreign Minister of Saudi Arabia that Assad undoubtedly will leave his position “either through a political process or he will be removed by force”, it is only a matter of time when will Assad transfer his power to the Governing Council. In his opinion this plan would be capable to avert failure in Syria and also it echoes the U.S. demands that demobilizing of Iraqi army has been of great use to its invasion. Now when the U.S-Syrian conflict escalates, it is dangerous to think that the repetition of similar actions could bring success.

The theses he used might be too harsh for public use but might be heard behind the scenes during conversations with the Saudis.

As reported by Democracy Now, “The U.S. seems to have lost some control over its allies in the region. On the surface, the United States is fighting against the Islamic State mainly because it went into Iraq. They didn’t seem to mind when they were just in Syria. But they’re still allowing Turkey to keep its border open for men and supplies to come into the Islamic State. And … they’re still allowing … the Islamic State and … other similar jihadist groups of al-Qaeda to receive weapons, including anti-tank weapons, from the Saudis. … (E)ither this is fine with American policy and consistent with it, or they’ve simply lost control over the course of events.”

The problem is whether the U.S plays a role of a “good cop” by comparison to the Saudis “bad cop” or did the U.S really lose management of the situation. The United States is obliged to direct the parade of the Western royalists in the Middle East but it turned out wrong: the Western Media defines America’s actions in Syria as passivity rather than brutal intervention despite the fact that Americans tend to accuse Syrian authorities of war deaths though the American role in escalating the conflict was proved.

Actually, Assad is not that condemned as we are told to think: the polls show that 55% of Syrians want him to keep the chair even under attack from NATO planes but it also is believed that his reign might lead to a parliamentary regime.

The U.S undeniably is a prime firearm and army power provider but it also seems to put all the efforts to ensure its proxies are in control of the country in the end. It is unclear whether the war would still escalate after Syria receives support from Russia, China and Iraq or will the USA seize control of a political transition in Syria. The future of Syria and the foreign policy of America is unveiling right now.

POPULAR ARTICLES

Not Found

OPINION

Vladimir Golstein

Vladimir Golstein

The Danderous Acceptance of Donald Trump

James N. Green

James N. Green

Politics in Brazil: Fasten Your Seat Belts!

Barbara H. Peterson

Barbara H. Peterson

Health officials confirm spread of Zika virus through sexual contact in Texas, first in US

Danny Haiphong

Danny Haiphong

WHY IS OTTO(SUPER)MAN ERDOGAN LOSING HIS CHARISMA?

Miray Aslan

Miray Aslan

How relations between Saudi Arabia and Iran reached a breaking point

Navid Nasr

Navid Nasr

How relations between Saudi Arabia and Iran reached a breaking point

Writers

chief editor

Joshua Tartakovsky

Analysis should serve as a method to better understand our world, not to obscure it.

Materials: 42

Specialization: Israel and the Middle East, US politics

Materials: 7

Specialization: Balkans, NATO and EU policies, Strategic communications

Materials: 3

Specialization: Foreign politics, Immigration, Human rights.

Materials: 2

Specialization: Political Science, Social Anthropology

Materials: 3

Specialization: Eastern Europe

Materials: 14

Specialization: Industrial Safety, Corporations

Materials: 12

Specialization: Eastern Europe, Labor movement

Materials: 3

Specialization: American history, way of life, and principles

Danielle Ryan

Ireland

Materials: 10

Specialization: US foreign policy, US-Russia relations and media bias

Materials: 20

Specialization: War, Racism, Capitalist exploitation, Civil rights

Materials: 8

Specialization: Modern Japanese History, Modern Chinese History, Military History, History of Counterinsurgency, History of Disobedience, Dynamics of Atrocities in Wartime

Dovid Katz

Lithuania

Materials: 3

Specialization: Holocaust Revisionism and Geopolitics; East European Far Right & Human Rights; Yiddish Studies & Litvak Culture

Materials: 20

Specialization: History, Catalunya, Spain, Geopolitics, Nationalism in Europe, Islamization, Immigration

Materials: 5

Materials: 3

Specialization: migration, international relations

Materials: 1

Specialization: Syria, US Foreign policy and strategies, BRICS/SCO

Materials: 19

Specialization: Balkans, Yugoslavia

Materials: 10

Specialization: Jihadist Groups, Islamic Terrorism, Global Security

Materials: 4

Specialization: Geopolitics

Materials: 4

Specialization: Media and government relations

Materials: 2

Specialization: Latin America, Brazil

Jay Watts

Canada

Materials: 2

Specialization: History, Marxism-Leninism, Imperialism, Anti-imperialism.

Materials: 2

Specialization: International Relations, Sociology, Geostrategy

Materials: 1

Specialization: civil rights

Lionel Baland

Belgium

Materials: 22

Specialization: Euroscepticism, Patriotic parties of Europe

Maram Susli

Australia

Materials: 3

Specialization: Geopolitics

Materials: 2

Specialization: Civil rights, Racism, US politics

Materials: 1

Specialization: geopolitics, economics

Max J. Schindler

Palestine-Israel

Materials: 9

Specialization: Politics

Miray Aslan

Turkey

Materials: 12

Specialization: Media, Politics

Materials: 5

Specialization: Politics, International relations

Navid Nasr

Croatia

Materials: 13

Specialization: Global security, Politics

Materials: 9

Specialization: Development of European Union, Non-governmental organizations, Politics and economics in Baltic States

Materials: 9

Specialization: Greece, Crisis of the US hegemony; Israel / Occupied Palestine, Oppression of Black people in the US

Materials: 4

Specialization: geopolitics, Russia, USSR

Pedro Marin

Brazil

Materials: 17

Specialization: Latin America, Ukraine, North Korea

Materials: 13

Specialization: Sustainable development, International relations, Comparative European politics, European integration, Eastern European politics and EU-Russia relations

Materials: 8

Specialization: Politics

Materials: 16

Specialization: Counterterrorist Finance

Seyit Aldogan

Greece

Materials: 3

Specialization: ISIS, Middle East, Globalization, Migrant crisis

Materials: 1

Specialization: Head of "Srebrenica Historical Project"

Materials: 3

Specialization: Economy, Social politics

Stevan Gajic

Serbia

Materials: 1

Specialization: Full time researcher at the Institute for European Studies

Materials: 5

Specialization: Geopolitics, Geoeconomics

Materials: 2

Specialization: Civil rights

Tobias Nase

Germany

Materials: 8

Specialization: Syria, US Foreign policy, Ukraine

Valerijus Simulik

Lithuania

Materials: 2

Specialization: Politics and economics in Baltic States, education and science, non - governmental organizations, globalization and EU

Van Gelis

Greece

Materials: 17

Specialization: Middle East

Materials: 1

Specialization: Kosovo, Serbia, Belgrad bombing

Materials: 5

Specialization: international relations, Russia

toTop