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Enough with the teddy bears and tears: it’s time to take our civilization back

Candles, flowers, hashtags. These are the best solutions the Western world seems to come up with every few months when we are slammed by another Islamist terrorist attack. We are our own sickness

Raheem Kassam in his article for Breitbart discusses why the likes at Facebook would never help the victims of terrorism and what should we do to fight against assaults.

The deadly terror attack in Brussels on Monday that resulted in dozens dead and hundreds injured generated a phenomenon that is commonly known as ‘solidarity’. The word, usually associated with left politics and socialism, means rather little in reality: now to express your compassion for a situation you may just change your Facebook profile picture accordingly. Now you may pat yourself on the back: you are standing in full solidarity.

As if pictures of dead bodies elicit little sympathy, Facebook users switched to Tricolores over their profile pictures: changing colors of the bands on the flags is meant to win compassion. From blue to black, from white to yellow. The blood red remains.

Teddy bears have become a new symbol of our response to a threat: we stay inanimate and squishy, unable to stand against killings and humiliations. Kassam continues: “Our security services and our police, hamstrung by political correctness, are just as interested (or more?) in rounding up Twitter “hate speech” offenders than criminal, rapist, or terrorist migrants. Our borders are as porous as our brains. We refuse to realise that there are now literally millions of people amongst us who hate us. Who hate our way of life, and who will, one day, dominate our public life.”

However, such harsh statements are considered ‘fear-mongering’ or alarmist. As if there has been not enough evidence that could confirm the fact that we are demeaned by those whom we have been helping. And there is all that ‘peace talk’ about ‘co-existence’, ‘integration’ and ‘tolerance’. We are ready to offer our best in defence of something that is not desired and call it a healthy aspiration for the society, condemning those who failed to ‘tolerate’ the most uncivilized traditions of foreign cultures.

“But come on, Raheem, not all immigrants, or Muslims, are criminals, or rapists…. you’re not!”

Yeah – and look at me. Excoriated daily by Islamists on Twitter. Why? Because I’ve integrated and I love my country. Because I refuse to believe that an Islamic caliphate is the best thing for Britain, or anywhere, quite frankly. Where is my white (or brown) knight? Where are the voices of the moderate Muslim world defending me?

Not that I need protection, or defence, but some people aren’t as hard headed or resolved as I am,” assumes Kassam.

So is it true that mourning over people you never knew only makes you feel better and does not provide real help? Sympathy is no bad thing, but one has to be brave and bold. Watching someone getting assaulted and then posting online about your sympathy is not enough. Giving a helping hand to those who are in danger is.

If the government elected by ourselves is unable to meet the challenge of keeping the nation safe, we should arm ourselves to defend our families, our properties, our communities and our neighbors. This is one of the reasons why arms sales to individuals have increasingly raised since the migrant crisis in Europe.

Kassam asserts: “When U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump said what he said about a temporary ban on Muslim immigration to Britain, the tolerance lobby went into overdrive: full condemnations across the board from politicians – including presidents and prime ministers, across the media sphere, and you will recall the House of Commons debating a petition to ban the man from the country.

Now even the most politically correct of Hollywood celebrities is asking: is he really that wrong on this?”

How can we protect our children in the future? Will they be destined to live in the cities with ‘peace’ signs scrawled onto bomb-struck buildings? Unlike our generation that had no choice when the world leaders decided to play the ‘diversity’ card, we can avoid making this mistake again.

“I would far rather be subjected to ceaseless “direct action” by the scourges of my own society than import others.

At least if my fellow countrymen are deplorable, I won’t get called a racist for pointing it out.

So put down the teddy bears, burst the balloons, and let’s start demanding again that our countries are safe and civilised,” concludes Kassam.

 

By Stefan Paraber for GIA.

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