Global Independent Analytics

Syria airstrikes: Has the West learned nothing after its 9/11 response?

Apparently, the deadly lessons of Sept. 11, 2001, have not been clear enough for David Cameron

David Wearing for CNN discusses lessons of 9/11: how the possible strikes on Syria might influence the contemporaneous world conflict?

Prime Minister of Great Britain recently supposed that international extremist have to be defended with the help of British army and air missiles. Unfortunately, repeating his forerunner’s mistakes of intruding Iraq 12 years ago, he also fails to acknowledge that those alleged strikes are very likely to escalate existing conflict in Syria. Thus his actions pose a direct threat to British nation and to other countries.

The fundamental detail in Cameron’s bombing plan bases on his assurance that not less than 70,000 non-extremist Syrian combatants would eagerly take part in the attacks thus helping British forces. Actually, the number is quit illogical since even the U.S. with its plan to use the help of 15,000 of “moderate” warriors failed to confront the Islamic State because in fact, only half a dozen troops have been put onto battleground.

The main obstacle his plan meets is the fact that there are no authentic non-extremists in amount of 70,000 because the original democratic opposition in Syria has been excelled by ISIS, that is, the affiliate of al-Qaeda in Syria. To suggest that Cameron’s dream forces would be available in the war-torn region is as groundless as was Tony Blair’s ignorance of intelligence warning against Iraq invasion.

Actually, determined ISIS opposition might be arranged only in case of serious de-escalation of the civil war and re-launch of national political process. Insofar, the outlook is rather shadowed because the major external players and their Syrian fellows never managed to bring each other to the negotiating table. This dissent mainly appeared because The U.K, the U.S. and their associates cogitated to expel Iran, who is as important Assad’s ally as Russia is. Now as Iran is included into the ring, the chances to establish diplomacy became slightly higher but still, the organization of EU International Syria Support Group would not bear fruit immediately and some time is needed to prepare and perform flourishing combat action.

Wearing concludes: “To judge the current prospects of Cameron's plan for Syria, look to Iraq, where ISIS was originally born in the chaos of the Anglo-American occupation. Since the U.K. joined air strikes there a year ago, progress has been limited, to put it gently.”

In May, when ISIS strategically succeeded in Ramadi conquering, the U.S. intelligence attempted to take off rose-colored glasses from its chiefs: the lack of any significant political process in regard of eventual division of Sunni Arabs capable of reclaiming important territory from the central authorities might very well lead to a failure.

The fact that Cameron plans to endanger British citizens has to be supported by anyhow stable and plausible strategy to defeat the extremist group in case something goes wrong. For the moment Cameron not only does not have a credible scheme, but also continues jeopardizing the nation by approaching to the wider region.

In the Middle East there is another extremist group of the Saudi royal family which has backed conservative Syrian groups and is a closest ally of Britain. However, British government did not cooperate with the Saudis in order to overthrow ISIS. Instead of it, London equips and finances the Saudis in their deadly fight in Yemen. The same happened in Egypt where Britain took the wrong side and backed jihadist and terroristic regime which opened doors to extremists of the Islamic State.

By the way, the ISIS branch in Egypt is the major suspect in the downing of a Russian jet airliner. Nevertheless, President of Egypt was warmly welcomed to Downing Street and sales of British weaponry in the region rocketed. Concerning the facts, thousands of tourists from the U.K. who each year visit Egypt, let alone ordinary Egyptians are in danger.

“Cameron's government has been looking for a way into the Syrian conflict for some time, likely motivated above all by the need to restore Britain's military credibility after the failures of Iraq, Afghanistan and Libya. But a new intervention will play directly into the narrative used by ISIS to lure the Western recruits most likely to carry out attacks in Britain. And London's continued support for authoritarian regimes merely enables the killings, abuses and misrule which allow extremist groups to flourish”, Wearing assumes.

It is safe to suppose that the authorities should provide security to its people, but considering Cameron’s actions, one can suspect that David needs to check his priorities in order to achieve positive outcome.

 

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