Global Independent Analytics

Is Assad Part of a Solution?

Russia is taking a long-range view and wants stability in post-ISIS Syria.

Lawrence Davidson for Consortium News discourses Bashar Assad’s role in Syrian terrorism and wonders, whether he really is not the reason, rather the solution.

According to Davidson’s view, Russia, in a long term prospect wants to establish balance in Syria after it is done with the Islamic State. On the contrary, the U.S. and France, who do not take long-term view into account, cannot provide any sane plan to reach stability in the region. Finally, Turkey allegedly would not refine Syria’s future at all as long as the war in the region hurts both Kurds and Assad.

Considering the aforementioned facts, it turns out that Vladimir Putin can rely only on the authorities of Damascus, because other “moderate” rebelling parties still cannot unite and cooperate even in the name of future political stability. Contemplating this, it is no wonder that Russia supports Assad’s regime which already has a government, an army and the loyalty of people.

Although it is believed by some that Assad and Putin are modern dictators, this cannot be lodged as objection: any other case scenario would only worsen the situation and split region into even more war-torn zones. “With the possible exception of Israel, this scenario is in no one’s interest, although it seems that the leaders of in Washington and Paris are too politically circumscribed to act on this fact”, assumed Davidson.

Knowing, that America and France do not care too much of Syria’s stability, it is safe to suppose that after the main military power of Syrian army is eradicated, the two countries (with the help of Turkey and Israel) would support slow-moving civil war against Assad.

President Obama has not failed to brag about how America guides the 65-countries coalition against ISIS but actually, most of them are not more than formal members, leading a double game. He also called Russia and Syria the outlying coalition of two despite the fact that exactly these countries are currently doing their best to fight terrorism and conveniently forgetting that the U.S. plan to defend terrorism in Syria failed and even now there is no adequate answer to the political vacuum in the region. The fact that America declined cooperation has led to U.S. army presence increase which I reality was not needed: the local soldiers are perfectly capable of the job and moreover, militants have been successfully provided by Hezbollah, Russia and Iran.

It is not clear yet where did the Turkey’s hatred to Syria come from: before the war the two countries shared good relationship. Maybe it happened because President Erdogan took Syria’s decision to keep up with Iran as the personal offence or because whatever more, but the result is dismal.

The anti-Syria attitude might have also caused Russian warplane downing. As it was reported, Turks suppose that the Russian plane illegally entered Turkish airspace and refused to go away when warned several times. The Russians deny this point of view. Later Turks claimed that they did not even know that the jet belonged to Russia until it was announced by Moscow, which is unbelievable. But ever considering these facts (which, however, can be easily fabricated), there was no need to shoot down the aircraft, even if it entered the airspace of Turkey. It was possible to count the incident as a mistake and not go beyond simple warning and formal protest. Now with the Turkey’s actions what remains is to shout out how Turkey has to be defended under NATO rules although no threat has been caused.

“In all of the bloodshed, population displacement and terror that has accompanied the Syrian civil war, the least-considered party has been the Syrian people and their future. ISIS, or at least its present infrastructure, will ultimately be destroyed. However, while that destruction is necessary, it is an insufficient outcome because it fails to provide long-term stability” concludes Davidson.

Now said stability can be provided only by keeping up with Damascus agenda, though, it would be quite hard for the U.S. politicos avoid interfering in not their business.

 

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