Global Independent Analytics

The Objectification of Muslims in America

In the wake of terrorist attacks, the United States shows the worst of its everyday bigotry.

In her article to The Atlantic Emma Green explains the phenomenon of everyday bigotry towards Islam.

The Muslims who migrated from contemporaneous Syria and Lebanon later have landed in Ohio and Michigan. The arrival of Muslims to the continent of North America coincides with the influx of Jews from Eastern Europe and Catholics from Ireland. Despite that, the story of their integration is not one of Catholics or Jews, or other religious minorities.

Recent terrorist attacks in Paris or Mali were claimed by the ISIS and the hostages were obliged to recite religious Islamic texts in order to be set free. Such extreme behavior seems to make a disservice for Muslim back-story and raises sharp criticism among media and politicos. The society mostly interprets anyone of Muslim origin as a terrorist, regardless of race, place of birth, duration of stay in the U.S. and other factors.

Such attitude has its consequences: for example, Donald Trump’s suggestion about mandatory registration for all of Muslim religion in the U.S. Asylums are no more granted to those of Syrian and Iraqi origin, who are struggling to flee from war. Mosques are being eliminated all the way from Tampa to Omaha. Muslim students are humiliated in campuses and Muslim tourists are refused service on the airplanes.

Almost all Republican candidates for presidential chair are waving away anti-Muslim conception and are bragging about safety and radicalization, but in fact this hatred did not evolve from the latest incidents; the Muslim alienation from inhabitants of America has been spanning over a number of years.

The habit of tokenizing and twisting Islamic culture has made it quite hard to change the way it is depicted in America. The recent terrorist attacked resulted in such question as “Is ISIS Islamic, or is it not? Should Muslims push back against extremism more than they have been—a challenge posed not by Republican politicians, but by President Obama?” questions Green.

Another example of public self-misdemeanouring is a viral video in which people rise up and condemn: “I’m Muslim, but…” Whatsoever they say after this introduction, whether it is “I love Jews” or “I’m not a terrorist” still sounds as if an excuse. Compare it to “I’m a serial killer, but…” Nevertheless, thousands of Muslims were more than happy to receive such opportunity to express their minds and to be heard.

In light of Paris attacks Muslims are identified as a mass and are blatantly stereotyped in keeping with the best traditions of obdurate public conscious, no matter how little do these people are like one another. Green asks: “Should shared religious beliefs create a sense of responsibility, such that Muslims are expected to be the loudest voices in publicly protesting Islamist terrorism—especially when those beliefs are only distantly shared, as the vast majority of Muslims loudly deny the Islamic State’s interpretation of the Koran?”

The dogmas of the Islamic State to not reflect the rules of Islam correctly, and crimes committed by extremists in the name of Islam are not influenced directly by its rules and do not represent actual beliefs of any other Muslims. In case apologies for such extremists are brought, the social alienation from American nation would grow even worse.

Muslims still have to prove their affiliation to America, and that is why people are calling for Muslims to come out or to admit that the Quran really inspired ISIS’ terrorists. This radical attitude influenced politicians to introduce laws which would not allow grant asylum to refugees of Muslim origin despite the claims that it was made only out of security considerations. Carson, Trump and other are appealing to fight any Muslim no matter how different are they from Islamic extremists.

This pure bigotry is clearly demonstrated right now, and this is what an average Muslim has to face every day. Every day small attempts are taken to change the way Muslims are integrated into American society but the bigotry and stereotyping would not let develop the new image of Muslim. Those who just occur to be engaged in Islamic beliefs should not be confused with those extremists fighting in the name of holy war.

EXPERT OPINION

Joshua Tartakovsky

The US has always been in need of an external enemy, first it was the USSR, now radical Islam and once again Russia. When the US supported radical Islamists and fostered genuine jihadists in Afghanistan, most Americans did not see Islam or Muslims as an enemy. But following US invasions in the Middle East, Muslims are once again seen as the enemy. Few Americans wonder however, if Islam and Muslims are our enemy, how come do we support the most backward and reactive Islamic state in existence: Saudi Arabia? These two issues are the questions the writer of this article refrains from asking, therefore he examines the symptoms but not its causes.
Read more

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